Summarize each of the seven roles that parents or guardians play in the lives of their children at home and at school.

This week you will begin developing your Children, Families, and Communities Guidebook. More specifically, you will be completing the Parenting Roles section. This week’s readings include the American College of Pediatricians (2013) position statement on the rights, roles, and responsibilities of parents. This resource presents seven distinct roles that families play in modern day parenting. The family’s role often has a direct impact on the developing child, as well as those to who educate them. It is important that early childhood professionals are knowledgeable of various parenting styles so that they can best support children’s development, along with supporting parental growth and learning.
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Guidebook Setup: You may choose one of the tools below to create your Children, Families, and Communities Guidebook, utilizing a text-based guidebook.
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Select one tool that you will use and add to each week to create your guidebook:
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Text-Based Guidebook: MS Word Document or .pdf, including text and images.
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Guidebook Title Page: Your Guidebook title page will help create a professional and knowledgeable image of who you are as an expert in family and community partnerships. Please include your name, title of your guidebook, and at least one relevant visual.
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Guidebook Parenting Roles Section: For this section, you are going to create a Parenting Roles newsletter that you can share with the families in your care. Create a one to two page newsletter that summarizes the seven roles that a parent or guardian plays in a child’s life at school and at home. Explain the potential positive and negative implications of the parental role. Finally, recommend one helpful resource that supports collaborative family relationships between the early childhood professional, parents or guardians, and the child.
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Content Expectations:
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Children, Families, and Communities Guidebook Title page: Set up your Children, Families, and Communities Guidebook with a title page, including your name, title of your guidebook, and at least one relevant visual.
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Parenting Roles Newsletter: Using Chapter 3 from the Gestwicki text as a guide for the seven parenting roles, create a newsletter that includes the following:
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1. Summarize each of the seven roles that parents or guardians play in the lives of their children at home and at school.
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2. Explain how each of the seven roles can directly impact children at home and at school, both positively and negatively.
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3. Recommend at least one resource that a family might use to learn about an aspect of child development or parenting. Please include an APA citation, summary of the resource, and a rationale of how it supports positive development.
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Writing and Formatting Expectations:
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Newsletter Appearance: Newsletter is well organized (i.e. formatted with easily read font, appealing colors, has a professional appearance, and includes a logical organization of the content).
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Organization: Demonstrates logical progression of ideas.
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Syntax and Mechanics: Writing displays meticulous comprehension and organization of syntax and mechanics, such as spelling, grammar, and punctuation.
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APA Formatting: Newsletter is formatted properly and all sources are cited and referenced in APA style. (I HAVE Copy and Paste The 7 PARENTING ROLES BELOW TO HELP WITH THIS ASSIGNMENT)
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1. The Parent as Nurturer
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The nurturing Encouraging, supporting, caring, nourishing. role encompasses all the affectionate care, attention, and protection that young children need to grow and thrive. This implies caring for the physical needs of children before and after birth, but perhaps the greatest needs for healthy development are emotional support and caring. Being a nurturer is the parent’s primary role in providing a psychological environment of warm, emotional interaction in which the child can thrive.
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2. The Parent in Adult Relationships
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Parents are people first, and there is evidence that those who are fulfilled and contented as individuals are better able to function effectively as parents than those who are disappointed in their personal lives. It is evident that the support one parent gives to the other facilitates the development of the parenting role as well as optimizing conditions for nurturing the child. Forty-eight percent of mothers report that their spouse or partner is the primary source for emotional support for parenting. Although the primary adult relationship may be with a marriage partner or cohabiting adult, the adult’s life may be crisscrossed with a network of adult relationships—parents, friends, and former spouses. In fact, many parents also help arrange for their own parents’ health or living conditions and must make complicated arrangements with former spouses to share custody and negotiate financial matters. The relationship with one’s child is an extremely important relationship, but it begins in the context of relationships with other adults.
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3. The Parent as an Individual
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Americans have come to value the development of the individual person. We are now aware that this personal development is a lifelong process. Parents concerned with nurturing their children’s development are also encountering growth in their own lives.
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It is relevant for teachers to consider how Erikson’s theory examines the psychosocial tasks of adulthood that must be resolved. Many young parents are preoccupied with issues of identity. Erikson speaks of this as the fifth stage, beginning in adolescence. With the prolonging of education and financial dependence on parents and with the confusing multiplicity of roles, careers, and lifestyles from which to select, many identity issues are still being actively worked on in young adulthood.
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4. The Parent as Worker
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The stage in the life cycle when parenting usually occurs is a time of concern with being productive. Most adults find their means to this goal in one or both of the two channels of parenting and work. However, the two are often in competition with each other, as parents try to navigate work and family life and try to do both well.
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About two-thirds of mothers with children younger than age six are currently employed outside the home; nearly 80 percent of mothers of school-aged children are working—41 percent of them full time.
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5. The Parent as Consumer
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With inflation rates that increase every year, the real buying power of modern families continues to decline. Economic survival with the multiple material demands and expectations of our time has been a major factor in establishing the two-working-parent family structure.
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A good deal of the family income is devoted to rearing children. Children at one time were considered to be an economic asset—more available workers in a rural, self-sufficient family—but must now be considered economic liabilities. Recent statistics show it costs well over $250,000—depending on the family’s income—to raise a child, with a whopping $32,000 spent in just the first two years.
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6. The Parent as Community Member
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With the increasing complexity of modern life, a growing number of family functions have been taken over by community institutions and organizations: education by the school system and recreation and entertainment by the Y and other clubs as well as the church, which has often expanded its purely religious function. There are as many organizations as there are interests in any given community. The community itself has become more highly structured as groups of people coming together have dictated more rules, legislation, and decision making—public and private.
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7. The Parent as Educator
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Perhaps the role for which parents feel most unprepared is the role of educator, used here to mean guiding and stimulating the child’s development and teaching the skills and knowledge that children need to eventually become effective adults in society. Nevertheless, families teach their children from the time they are babies and continue to teach them what they consider important throughout their life in the home.

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