The essay must have: • a bibliography • all sources properly referenced • approp

The essay must have:
• a bibliography
• all sources properly referenced
• appropriately labelled illustrations
The subject needs to be within the area of interest for the school of art and interior design . I would like a description of the interior design of each of this periods, followed by a comparation between the two timeframes and maybe write about the timless styles of the 80’s and how they are still used in modern times.

The essay must have: • a bibliography • all sources properly referenced • approp

The essay must have:
• a bibliography
• all sources properly referenced
• appropriately labelled illustrations
The subject needs to be within the area of interest for the school of art and interior design . I would like a description of the interior design of each of this periods, followed by a comparation between the two timeframes and maybe write about the timless styles of the 80’s and how they are still used in modern times.

The essay must have: • a bibliography • all sources properly referenced • approp

The essay must have:
• a bibliography
• all sources properly referenced
• appropriately labelled illustrations
The subject needs to be within the area of interest for the school of art and interior design . I would like a description of the interior design of each of this periods, followed by a comparation between the two timeframes and maybe write about the timless styles of the 80’s and how they are still used in modern times.

The essay must have: • a bibliography • all sources properly referenced • approp

The essay must have:
• a bibliography
• all sources properly referenced
• appropriately labelled illustrations
The subject needs to be within the area of interest for the school of art and interior design . I would like a description of the interior design of each of this periods, followed by a comparation between the two timeframes and maybe write about the timless styles of the 80’s and how they are still used in modern times.

The essay must have: • a bibliography • all sources properly referenced • approp

The essay must have:
• a bibliography
• all sources properly referenced
• appropriately labelled illustrations
The subject needs to be within the area of interest for the school of art and interior design . I would like a description of the interior design of each of this periods, followed by a comparation between the two timeframes and maybe write about the timless styles of the 80’s and how they are still used in modern times.

The essay must have: • a bibliography • all sources properly referenced • approp

The essay must have:
• a bibliography
• all sources properly referenced
• appropriately labelled illustrations
The subject needs to be within the area of interest for the school of art and interior design . I would like a description of the interior design of each of this periods, followed by a comparation between the two timeframes and maybe write about the timless styles of the 80’s and how they are still used in modern times.

The essay must have: • a bibliography • all sources properly referenced • approp

The essay must have:
• a bibliography
• all sources properly referenced
• appropriately labelled illustrations
The subject needs to be within the area of interest for the school of art and interior design . I would like a description of the interior design of each of this periods, followed by a comparation between the two timeframes and maybe write about the timless styles of the 80’s and how they are still used in modern times.

Upon completion of this week, you will be able to: Describe the concepts of vali

Upon completion of this week, you will be able to:
Describe the concepts of validity and reliability as applied to quantitative research.
Examine and analyze the different purposes, design elements, and methodological concepts of quantitative research design.
For this discussion, please write purpose statements for a correlational research study and a causal-comparative research study.
For correlational research:
Identify a group.
Identify two variables that might be related and are relevant for that group. Remember, for a correlational study, both variables must have a wide range of possible values. For example, weight has a wide range of possible values, while being healthy or unhealthy does not.
Write a purpose statement for a correlational study using the group and two variables.
For causal-comparative research:
Your purpose statement should be one to two sentences in length and should include the sample for the study and the two variables that will be measured.
Support your statements with evidence from the required studies and your research.
Required Reading and References
Bhattacherjee, A. (2012). Social science research: Principles, methods, and practices. Global Text Project.
Chapter 5: Research Designs
Chapter 7: Scale Reliability and Validity
· https://scholarcommons.usf.edu/oa_textbooks/3/
Adams, A., & da Silva, S. (2019). Ancillary materials for psychology research methods and data analysis I – Correlational research overview [PPT]. Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work Ancillary Materials, 16. https://oer.galileo.usg.edu/psychology-ancillary/16
Adams, A., & da Silva, S. (2019). Ancillary materials for psychology research methods and data analysis I – Causal-comparative research overview [PPT]. Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work Ancillary Materials, 16. https://oer.galileo.usg.edu/psychology-ancillary/16
Adams, A., & da Silva, S. (2019). Ancillary materials for psychology research methods and data analysis I – Experimental research overview [PPT]. Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work Ancillary Materials, 16. https://oer.galileo.usg.edu/psychology-ancillary/16
Bhattacherjee, A. (2012). Social science research: Principles, methods, and practices. USF Tampa Library Open Access Collections
Brown, S. M., & Walberg, H. J. (1993). Motivational effects on test scores of elementary students. Journal of Educational Research, 86(3), 133–136. doi:10.1080/00220671.1993.9941151
Elwell, N. (2013). Cheat sheet topic: Design decision tree [PDF]. Department of Education, Concordia University – Nebraska

I will be providing the following documents and text to show what I need for my

I will be providing the following documents and text to show what I need for my assessment. I am asking for the following to be complete; ( section 5,6,7,8) References and appendices. Totalling 2500 words
https://edu.ewbchallenge.org/challenge/centre-for-appropriate-technology/
https://edu.ewbchallenge.org/participants-resources/previous-top-reports/
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coolgardie_safe
Coolgardie safe – Wikipedia
The Coolgardie safe is a low-tech food storage unit, using evaporative cooling to prolong the life of whatever edibles are kept in it. It applies the basic principle of heat transfer which occurs during evaporation of water (see latent heat and heat of evaporation).It was named after the place where it was invented – the small mining town of Coolgardie, Western Australia, near Kalgoorlie-Boulder
en.m.wikipedia.org
Assessment Aims
Participating in the Engineers Without Borders (EWB) Challenge presents you with unique opportunities to learn about appropriate design, teamwork and communication through real, inspiring, sustainable and cross-cultural development projects identified by EWB with its community-based partner organisations.
Past EWB Challenges have included developing innovative and sustainable project ideas and solutions to support communities in Vanuatu, Vietnam, India, Nepal, Cameroon, Zambia and rural Australia. The 2021 EWB Challenge program is delivered in partnership with the Centre for Appropriate Technology (CfAT) with a focus on CfAT’s work with communities in the Cape York region of Far North Queensland.
Your challenge this year is to develop appropriate engineering solutions to assist with creating sustainable livelihoods for these communities.
The challenge is separated into seven overarching design areas including; Transport & Access, Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Structures, Energy, Water Management, Waste and Reuse and Conservation and Land Management.
Selected reports will be submitted to the EWB Challenge Program and shared with CfAT to support their work in the Cape York region. Therefore, through this assessment, you can make a real difference in the lives of real people.
In addition to the presentation, your team will also submit a written report of up to 6,000 words illustrating the final design solution. The report must include the following sections:
– Title Page: Use the template provided – no need to include student ID number, instead include your UniSA username.
– Executive Summary. Executive Summary is another name for an Abstract and is typically used in industry-based reports.
– Team Introduction & Reflection. Firstly, introduce your team members, providing a brief summary of their relevant skills and attributes and how they contributed to the project. Then, reflect on how you worked as a team. Include a copy of your team agreement in the Appendix and refer to this in your discussion. You may also want to include minutes from your meetings as evidence of your collaboration. Note: The team reflection is the only section in the report to be written in the first person (“I”, “We”).
– Disclaimer, Contents, List of Figures
– Introduction. Briefly introduce the project and what will be discussed in the Report.
– Problem definition. State the project scope, provide the background and significance of the project.
Problem scope. This is a short paragraph defining what the problem is.
Background. Summarise your research to provide a background to the project. This section is also known as a Literature Review in academic writing.
Design Criteria. Discuss the design criteria you identified based on the background research.
– Design Options. Describe and evaluate three possible solutions that meet the design criteria, one of which is your final design.
– Design Description and Design Implementation. This section describes your solution to the problem, both in terms of what it is and how it works. Include relevant calculations appropriate to the level of team experience and include figures and drawings.
– Discussion. Explain how the selected design is appropriate to the social, environmental, economic and cultural context of the design location. Discuss the ethics, long term sustainability and maintenance requirements of your team’s design. Also cite relevant Design Standards.
– Evaluation. Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of your design. Evaluate your design and how it meets the design criteria.
– Conclusion. Summarise important points raised in the report and how they fit together. Identify any broader implications and areas of potential development for the future.
– References. List sources you cited in the report. You should include at least 10 references. These can be academic references as well as any other relevant sources, including company websites, grey literature, etc.
– Appendices. Include a copy of your Team Agreement, meeting minutes and any supplementary information considered too long or not quite relevant enough to be included in the main body. This includes technical data, letters, additional drawings/figures, charts etc.
The report template will guide you in this task. You will also find more information in the report writing activities included in Week 4 of this course.
Note that this is a team report, but there is also an individually assessed component. Each team member is expected to contribute approximately 1,500 words or word equivalents (charts, tables etc).
As with the presentation, you must clearly identify the contributor/s of each section in the report. You can do this by placing the contributor’s name in the document header (top right corner of the page in the template).
While individual contributions must be acknowledged, the report should be cohesive and presented as one. This can be achieved by carefully coordinating team members’ contributions, making links between different parts clear and explicit, using good transition strategies leading from one section to the next, and maintaining a similar style throughout.
In designing your team solution, we recommend that you consider the following factors to help ensure that your design is appropriate to the communities and context:
Sustainability of design – Consider the long-term sustainability of your project proposal. What measures could be put in place to ensure the successful continuation into the future?
Impacts to the community – What impact will your design have on members of the community? Who are your key stakeholders? Is there anyone you haven’t included?
Cultural and social factors – Does your design align with or celebrate the cultural and social practices of people who live and work in the selected community?
Community engagement – How would you propose that EWB and partner organisations engage and consult the community throughout the project? Think about the initial design right through to implementation. What avenues are there for community members to become involved?
Environment – What impact, both positive and negative, will your design have on the local environment? What measures can you put in place to mitigate any negative impacts?
Cost and economic benefits – What is an estimated cost of the project, i.e. initial costs, material costs, implementation, operation/program delivery costs, and maintenance costs? Consider if there are any potential economic benefits to the community which could result from the project.
Technical design – Is the technical design the most appropriate for the community? Take the time to show what alternatives were considered and why you are proposing your design as the most appropriate. Previous EWB Challenges show that the most successful designs are often ones that are simple in design and can be implemented/prototyped (tested) rapidly in the community.
Materials – It is recommended to use locally available materials that are culturally acceptable and environmentally friendly wherever possible. Transportation of project materials and availability of materials which might be required for future maintenance is a significant consideration for projects in the EWB project community. Where might your proposed materials be sourced from?
Construction / Implementation and ongoing running of the program – Who might construct and/or implement the project? Are you able to engage local residents or organisations?