Summarize Film

What is the surface meaning of the film? What was actually filmed? Describe the basics of the imagery and whether there are clear characters or narrative. If a narrative exists, describe it.
Does the film offer any subtextual meaning? Can it be identified with a particular concept, set of concepts or ideology?
Does the film offer clues as to the context of its creation? Is there anything socially, culturally or politically relevant about the film?
Does the film make any direct or indirect commentary on mainstream cinema?
What else do you find of particular interest about the film?
Average length of analyses should be 300-700 words.

Module 1 reflection

The reflections can be about what you found new, intriguing, puzzling, etcetera, for the assigned reading in the textbook, assigned videos, and assigned articles. The journal reflections can also be about what you found interesting in some of the classmate’s “post” comments, and any additional suggested sources (URLs, books, articles) related to the topic(s) covered in a module.
Book: Schrum, L., & Levin, B. (2015). Leading 21st-century schools – Harnessing technology for engagement and achievement (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Inc.

How do patterns of editing in Man with a Movie Camera communicate a theme? Write no more than 500 words.

What do we mean by “patterns of editing”?
Not just the content of individual shots, but the way that specific editing techniques consistently emphasize connections between the things depicted. Is one technique doing a particular kind of work?
What do we mean by “theme” in this film?
Including but not limited to: the city as a living thing, the virtues of working together, the power of cinema, the modernization of the Soviet Union, etc.
Common conventions when writing about film:
When mentioning a scene, indicate in parentheses the time code for the start of the scene or moment under discussion. For example, “When we first see Lucy in the office (3:20), she is wearing a gray blouse and skirt.” Please note that reference to a time code is NOT a substitute for accurate, detailed, and vivid descriiption.
Italicize or underline film titles—no quotation marks or bold.
Refer to characters by the character’s name, not the actor’s name (see above for a list).
Use the literary present tense when describing events in the fictional world: “Literary works, paintings, films, and other artistic creations are assumed to exist in an eternal present. Therefore, when you write about writers or artists as they express themselves in their work, use the present tense.” Vanderbilt Writing Studio. (For more information on the literary present tense, see this helpful guide.)

a specific film

Select one film of feature length made during the time period of 1970 – 2000. You are not to use a film already used by you, the instructor or the course content. In your term paper, you should present information about the making of the movie, about its success at the box office, about awards it was nominated for and/or received. Also present a sampling of the critical reaction to the film, from both the time of its release and later. Finally, you should watch the film and react to it. Do not summarize the plot. Assume that I’ve already seen the film. In addition, write about how this director used the following in these films: Editing (montage), Sound and Music, Cinematography, Special Camera Work (steady cam, hand held, optical effects), Special Effects (this can include stunt work).
Your proposal must include the following for maximum points.
1. Provide a title for your proposed project
2. Clearly state which option you are choosing and the subject within that option
3. How you propose to research your topic (no specific resources required at this stage)
4. A 600 word summary of all of your ideas and justification for choosing this topic. This is a research and personal reflection paper, if you choose a Director or movie or element of film that means something to you, it can make for a more interesting and informed paper.
this is a proposal for the topic.

Continue to practice film criticism conventions in this post. This time introdu

Continue to practice film criticism conventions in this post. This time introduce the film’s theme, the director, and leading actors. Then summarize what the film is about and themes Buster Keaton develops throughout The General.
In your second paragraph, align your view of the film with a critical point or two expressed in “The Cinematic Lost Cause.” Don’t feel compelled to agree or disagree with the author, but utilize ideas that might overlap with your own. Or, disagree with a point of view from the article but rely on evidence from the film to do so.
Practice citing film and articles according to MLA citation rules. Two items should be in Works Cited.
https://publicdomainreview.org/collection/the-general-1926

Writing a film reaction paper of 1000 to 1250 words (4 to 5 pages) that fulfills

Writing a film reaction paper of 1000 to 1250 words (4 to 5 pages) that fulfills the requirements listed below.
Your final project must address the items listed below as well as draw on other concepts you have learned throughout the semester to demonstrate your mastery of the diverse aspects of American cinema discussed in this course.
In your project, you must:
Summarize key aspects of the film (plot, characters, themes, etc.).
Discuss the specific genre of the chosen film.
Identify the period during which the film was made and the period it portrays.
Identify any pertinent economic issues regarding the making of the film.
Determine the cultural features of both the time period depicted and the time period during which the film was made and comment on the interplay of these elements with the film itself.
Explain the impact that this film has had on American popular culture.
Use technological and critical language correctly.

Address the following areas within the standard 250-350 word count range. Always

Address the following areas within the standard 250-350 word count range. Always place the total word count number at the beginning of your post (not including citations).
1. Research and recap a bit about the financial and business considerations that went in to making the assigned movie (not its box office and more information than just its budget). This will require some outside research about your film from valid, vetted sources. Use at least two respected industry sites, such as Variety, Deadline Hollywood, Vanity Fair or Entertainment Weekly to find out more about the film you chose. Avoid Wikipedia and IMDB.com and aggregate, click-bait sites.
2. Speculate about how those considerations altered the final film product. You may consider casting, production, distribution, or any other component of the project. For example, if you were to discover that budgetary restrictions required that a film crew use studio shooting (using built sets on film lots) instead of on-location shooting (shooting in the “real” world), you could argue how the film’s look or impact might have been changed by on-location shooting. In short, consider how at least one aspect of the business of film altered the end-product of film.
Always cite your sources in your posts (do not put citations in the comments section). Your citations do not have to be full, formal citations, but always include active links and an acknowledgment of title. Please place your active links at the bottom of the post.
Make sure that the post is still, overwhelmingly, your original writing and not primarily quotations or repackaged content.

Basically it is short essay style questions analysis 2 films base on 4 questions

Basically it is short essay style questions analysis 2 films base on 4 questions in APA and GSP matters. I think you have to watch those 2 films or read summary about it to able to write.
1. It’s Not Yet Dark (2015/2017) Irish documentary (81 mins)
2. My Name is Emily (2015/2016/2017) Film dates are per different releases–same film. (94 mins)
So the film label 1 and 2 in questions. Just like I did above 1. Its Not Yet Dark. 2. My Name is Emily
Here are those questions:
1. Film #1: Using the ideological approach to amplifying a film narrative about being disabled, (your global issue), address: Sound, Silence and Composition/Action. Be sure to discuss a specific scene from It’s Not Yet Dark.
2. Film #2: Find three specific scenes that relate to the writer/director’s POV, (mise en scene). This is what you learned from the first film. Be sure to approach each scene using film language per your Writing About Film text.
3. Films 1 & 2: What ideological aspect of being disabled occurs in both films? Explain using film language.
4. Any lessons learned regarding crafting a film narrative from idea to implementation from either film? What essentially did you find most enlightening?
1. Film #1: Using the ideological approach to amplifying a film narrative about being disabled, (your global issue), address: Sound, Silence and Composition/Action. Be sure to discuss a specific scene from It’s Not Yet Dark.

“The film is infamously (and disturbingly) well known for its graphic violence;

“The film is infamously (and disturbingly) well known for its graphic violence; if broken down into two half’s, comment on how the violence evolves from outward physicality to inward decimation (though neither is mutually exclusive).” Watch the film and write 250 words about it. Then, respond to the comment underneath. “This was my first time seeing the film, but I have been aware of how popular and controversial Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange is. On a technical level, the film is gorgeous with its striking cinematography and eye catching costume and set designs. Music also had a crucial role in the film, as mentioned in Screening Space: “Beethoven, of course, was a metaphor originated not by Kubrick but by Anthony Burgess in his novel. But Kubrick does more than add a few musical flourishes to his realization of the Burgess novel. He selects other classical (and in some instances popular) pieces of music to not only emotionally heighten particular scenes, but also to provide an artistic superstructure, which results in a film form congruent with film theme” (214). And the film’s classical music juxtaposes with the graphic violent imagery found in the film. But what stood out to me from the film was this quote: “Goodness is something to be chosen. When a man cannot choose, he ceases to be a man.” Kubrick’s science fiction film is a social tale about institutionalized brutality, human nature, and the power of choice, but it also puts us in an uncomfortable viewing, witnessing the events unfold in a bleak dystopian world that is tied to psychology and violence.
It was a difficult film for me to watch with the horrific scenes, but the film’s tone is meant to parallel the story’s themes being cold, brutal, and dystopian. We are supposed to feel a disconnect and difficulty associating with Alex. A psychopath and unreliable narrator, I would consider Alex to be one of the most tricky characters I’ve seen in cinema. He fools us in the third act, and we are left to witness that despite the “rehabilitation” and attempt to convert him, he remains the same and goes back to his old evil ways and thoughts. But the true revelation here is how the authorities accept it and are somewhat similar to Alex. To suppress his violent and sexual urges by brainwashing him, they strip away his individualism and personal agency, to the point that Alex cannot enjoy “freedom” or Beethoven anymore and therefore becomes “a clockwork.” With their aversion therapy, we witness how the government was as violent and sadistic as Alex. There is a sense of moral corruption and hypocrisy in them, wanting to just use Alex as a political tool. Just as they experiment on and manipulate Alex for their own benefit, Alex does the same to them. “Violence makes violence.”
Kubrick succeeds in creating a dystopia that does not require new technology or aliens, and he does this by exploring a world where free will is being tested and taken away but with a sinister character. This is what makes the story complex because we understand it is wrong for human liberty to be threatened and removed, but we see this being done with a character like Alex. The author of the book, Anthony Burgess writes: “Take the story as a kind of moral parable, and you won’t go far wrong. Alex is a very nasty young man, and he deserves to be punished, but to rid him of the capacity of choosing between good and evil is the sin against the Holy Ghost, for which—so we’re told—there’s no forgiveness. And although he’s nasty, he’s also very human. In other words, he’s ourselves, but a bit more so. He has the three main human attributes—love of aggression, love of language, love of beauty. But he’s young and has not yet learned the true importance of the free will he so violently delights in. In a sense he’s in Eden, and only when he falls (as he does: from a window) does he become capable of being a full human being.”
Is it right to strip away someone’s free will even if they are bad? How or can change truly occur if there is no freedom? Is “free will” or choice simply an illusion? Overall the film makes us think about these complicated questions and ideas like the treatment of conscience as a commodity, actions without consequences, and a world where choices can either be limited or unlimited. It raises questions about morality, justice, and conforming. A Clockwork Orange is not only a challenging film for audiences to watch, but it is also a challenging film for audiences to think about.” THERE SHOULD BE 2 DIFFERENT COMMENTS.

1. What colors are most predominant in the movie? What costume and colors are as

1. What colors are most predominant in the movie?
What costume and colors are associated with the protagonist?
What costume and colors are associated with the antagonist?
Response:
2. What objects are most often associated with the protagonist?
What do they suggest about his values, character, and life?
What does he not have?
Response:
3. What objects are most often associated with the antagonist?
What do they suggest about his values, character, and life?
What does he not have?
Response:
4. Review the Interactive Tutorials on Light and Color, especially those on Lighting Quality and Exposure and Color Contrast and Saturation.
How are light and color used to enhance the overall feel of the movie?
Response:
Review the Interactive Tutorial on Composition and respond to the following questions (5, 6, and 7):
5. The first shot we see of Hoffman’s office (moment 1:30) is through the goldfish bowl, with a single goldfish. What does that shot tell us about Hoffman?
Response:
6. At moment 7:15 we see Hoffman watching the beggar with binoculars, providing a kind of “iris” view. We see the same type of shot in moment 11:10 when he watches his secretary meet her boyfriend after work. What do those shots indicate about Hoffman?
Response:
7. The opening shot appears to be looking up at skyscrapers, but the second shot reveals that we are actually seeing a reflection of skyscrapers on the hood of a car. As you watch the film, notice how often we see reflections, especially in glass. List two or three such shots and comment on what you think they imply.