Read the article from the link below. (I HAVE ATTACHED THE ARTICLE)After reading

Read the article from the link below. (I HAVE ATTACHED THE ARTICLE)After reading the article make a summary of no more than 500 words.Make sure to discuss, what was the Bretton Woods system of Exchange rates? What were it’s advantages and disadvantages? What happened after Bretton Woods was abandoned? Can the PPP or Balassa Samuelson Theories explain the short term fluctuations in Exchange rates? How about the long term?FORMATYour summary should be 400-­‐500 words.I have also attached the rubric so that you have an idea how the assignment will be graded
Requirements: full

Make a post eligible to earn moneyYou need to join the Medium Partner Program to

Make a post eligible to earn moneyYou need to join the Medium Partner Program to be able to earn money from your content. Learn more.Publishing a new story to earn moneyOnce you’re done writing your story, click Publish.Make sure the checkbox Meter my story so it is eligible to earn money is checked.Click Publish now to publish your post.That’s it! You’ll automatically be paid every month based on reading time from Medium members, and you can track your progress every week in your Partner Dashboard.Making a published story eligible to earn moneyFollow the steps below to add your published post to Medium’s paywallEnter edit mode by visiting your post page, clicking the three-dot button in the top-right corner and choosing Edit story.In edit mode, click the three-dot button in the top-right corner of the page.From the drop-menu, click Manage meter setting.Check the Meter my story so it is eligible to earn money checkbox.Click Save. Your post is now eligible to earn money.
Requirements: Medium   |   .doc file

ECON102W1Discuss the three primary concerns in macroeconomic analysis. W2Gross D

ECON102W1Discuss the three primary concerns in macroeconomic analysis. W2Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is the broadest measure of output for an economy. However, GDP does not perfectly measure well-being of a nation and its citizens’ welfare. Discuss what GDP is and what it measures? Discuss what the shortcomings (limitations) of GDP as a measure of well-being and welfare of a nation are?W3What are the three types of unemployment? Unemployment is seen by some as undesirable. Are all three types of unemployment undesirable? Could the advent of the Internet completely eliminate frictional unemployment? Are all three types of unemployment undesirable? Explain.W4Classical economists belief that prices and quantities adjust to the changes in the forces of supply and demand and that the economy produces its potential output in the long run. On the contrary, Keynesian economists believe because of price and wage rigidities the economy’s equilibrium output in the long run may be less than its potential output. What is price-wage rigidity? Do you agree with Keynes assessment that wage-price rigidity requires government’s involvement in the markets? Why? Why not?
Requirements: 200 each   |   .doc file

Learning Goal: I’m working on a macro economics question and need an explanation

Learning Goal: I’m working on a macro economics question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.
Instructions – PLEASE READ THEM CAREFULLY
You are advised to make their work clear and well presented, marks may be reduced for poor presentation.
You must mention question number clearly in their answer.
Avoid plagiarism, the work should be in your own words, copying from other resources without proper referencing will result in ZERO marks.
All answered must be typed using Times New Roman (size 12, double-spaced) font. No pictures containing text will be accepted and will be considered plagiarism).

Learning Goal: I’m working on a macro economics question and need an explanation

Learning Goal: I’m working on a macro economics question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.
The require chapter is attached
Case Study
When taxes induce people to change their behavior—such as inducing Jane to buy less pizza—the taxes cause deadweight losses and make the allocation of resources less efficient. As we have already seen, much government revenue comes from the individual income tax in many countries. In a case study in Chapter 8, we discussed how this tax discourages people from working as hard as they otherwise might. Another inefficiency caused by this tax is that it discourages people from saving.
Consider a person 25 years’ old who is considering saving $1,000. If he puts this money in a savings account that earns 8 percent and leaves it there, he would have $21,720 when he retires at age 65. Yet if the government taxes one-fourth of his interest income each year, the effective interest rate is only 6 percent. After 40 years of earning 6 percent, the $1,000 grows to only $10,290, less than half of what it would have been without taxation. Thus, because interest income is taxed, saving is much less attractive.
Some economists advocate eliminating the current tax system’s disincentive toward saving by changing the basis of taxation. Rather than taxing the amount of income that people earn, the government could tax the amount that people spend.
Under this proposal, all income that is saved would not be taxed until the saving is later spent. This alternative system, called a consumption tax, would not distort people’s saving decisions.
Various provisions of the current tax code already make the tax system a bit like a consumption tax. Taxpayers can put a limited amount of their saving into special accounts—such as Individual Retirement Accounts and 401(k) plans—that escape taxation until the money is withdrawn at retirement. For people who do most of their saving through these retirement accounts, their tax bill is, in effect, based on their consumption rather than their income.
European countries tend to rely more on consumption taxes than does the United States. Most of them raise a significant amount of government revenue through a value-added tax, or a VAT. A VAT is like the retail sales tax that many U.S. states use, but rather than collecting all of the tax at the retail level when the consumer buys the final good, the government collects the tax in stages as the good is being produced (that is, as value is added by firms along the chain of production). Various U.S. policymakers have proposed that the tax code move further in direction of taxing consumption rather than income. In 2005, economist Alan Greenspan, then Chairman of the Federal Reserve, offered this advice to a presidential commission on tax reform: “As you know, many economists believe that a consumption tax would be best from the perspective of promoting economic growth—particularly if one were designing a tax system from scratch—because a consumption tax is likely to encourage saving and capital formation. However, getting from the current tax system to a consumption tax raises a challenging set of transition issues.”
Q1 – What should be taxed – Personal Income or Personal Consumption and why? Provide your opinion based on the case given above. (Minimum 200 Words).
Q2 – How may it affect Saudi Economy if an income tax is imposed in KSA?(Minimum 200 Words)?
Q3 – In each of the following cases, determine how much GDP and each of its components is affected?
Ahmad spends $300 to buy his dinner at the finest restaurant in Boston.
Abdul spends $1500 on a new laptop to use it in his software company in KSA.The laptop was built in China.
Jane spends $1200 on a computer to use in her editing business.She got last year’s model on sale for a great price from a local manufacturer.
General Motors builds $500 million worth of cars, but consumers only buy $470 million worth of them.
· ****** The require chapter is attached ******

Learning Goal: I’m working on a macro economics question and need an explanation

Learning Goal: I’m working on a macro economics question and need an explanation and answer to help me learn.
The require chapter is attached
Case Study
When taxes induce people to change their behavior—such as inducing Jane to buy less pizza—the taxes cause deadweight losses and make the allocation of resources less efficient. As we have already seen, much government revenue comes from the individual income tax in many countries. In a case study in Chapter 8, we discussed how this tax discourages people from working as hard as they otherwise might. Another inefficiency caused by this tax is that it discourages people from saving.
Consider a person 25 years’ old who is considering saving $1,000. If he puts this money in a savings account that earns 8 percent and leaves it there, he would have $21,720 when he retires at age 65. Yet if the government taxes one-fourth of his interest income each year, the effective interest rate is only 6 percent. After 40 years of earning 6 percent, the $1,000 grows to only $10,290, less than half of what it would have been without taxation. Thus, because interest income is taxed, saving is much less attractive.
Some economists advocate eliminating the current tax system’s disincentive toward saving by changing the basis of taxation. Rather than taxing the amount of income that people earn, the government could tax the amount that people spend.
Under this proposal, all income that is saved would not be taxed until the saving is later spent. This alternative system, called a consumption tax, would not distort people’s saving decisions.
Various provisions of the current tax code already make the tax system a bit like a consumption tax. Taxpayers can put a limited amount of their saving into special accounts—such as Individual Retirement Accounts and 401(k) plans—that escape taxation until the money is withdrawn at retirement. For people who do most of their saving through these retirement accounts, their tax bill is, in effect, based on their consumption rather than their income.
European countries tend to rely more on consumption taxes than does the United States. Most of them raise a significant amount of government revenue through a value-added tax, or a VAT. A VAT is like the retail sales tax that many U.S. states use, but rather than collecting all of the tax at the retail level when the consumer buys the final good, the government collects the tax in stages as the good is being produced (that is, as value is added by firms along the chain of production). Various U.S. policymakers have proposed that the tax code move further in direction of taxing consumption rather than income. In 2005, economist Alan Greenspan, then Chairman of the Federal Reserve, offered this advice to a presidential commission on tax reform: “As you know, many economists believe that a consumption tax would be best from the perspective of promoting economic growth—particularly if one were designing a tax system from scratch—because a consumption tax is likely to encourage saving and capital formation. However, getting from the current tax system to a consumption tax raises a challenging set of transition issues.”
Q1 – What should be taxed – Personal Income or Personal Consumption and why? Provide your opinion based on the case given above. (Minimum 200 Words).

Q2 – How may it affect Saudi Economy if an income tax is imposed in KSA?(Minimum 200 Words)?

Q3 – In each of the following cases, determine how much GDP and each of its components is affected?

Ahmad spends $300 to buy his dinner at the finest restaurant in Boston.
Abdul spends $1500 on a new laptop to use it in his software company in KSA.The laptop was built in China.
Jane spends $1200 on a computer to use in her editing business.She got last year’s model on sale for a great price from a local manufacturer.
General Motors builds $500 million worth of cars, but consumers only buy $470 million worth of them.
· ******
The require chapter is attached ******